logo
burger-icon

Does it matter what the sources of calories are or is it enough to just keep track of the amount to maintain a healthy and optimal weight?

d-r Angelina Nedyalkova

3 min reading time

26-08-2020

Title:Does it matter what the sources of calories are or is it enough to just keep track of the amount to maintain a healthy and optimal weight?
Headline:Does it matter what the sources of calories are or is it enough to just keep track of the amount to maintain a healthy and optimal weight?Author:

26-08-2020
Dianurse.com - BG

Does it matter what the sources of calories are or is it enough to just keep track of the amount to maintain a healthy and optimal weight?


Description:Quality is important. Learn how to maintain a healthy and optimal weight.
Image:https://images.ctfassets.net/wv9nw02wyyx8/1Pq8m98yDOC80Zlc9uDqWG/661d6f5e3e579e81b6ac4ced6b195611/05-Does-it-matter-en.jpg?w=500&q=100

Does it matter what the sources of calories are or is it enough to just keep track of the amount to maintain a healthy and optimal weight?

“Calories are calories” is a recurring slogan in nutrition, and eating moderate amounts of food without overeating is a really important measure. It is not a good idea to focus only on calories, because new research shows that quality is key in determining what we should avoid in order to achieve and maintain a healthy weight.

Instead of choosing foods based only on their caloric content, consider choosing high-quality and healthy foods, as well as minimizing low-quality ones. For example:

High-quality foods include unrefined, minimally processed foods such as vegetables and fruits, whole grains, healthy fats, and healthy sources of protein.

Lower-quality foods include highly processed packaged foods (semi-finished and manufactured foods), sugary drinks, refined (white) grains, refined sugar, fried foods, foods high in saturated and trans fats, and foods with a high glycemic index such as potatoes.

Quality is important

One study analyzed whether certain foods were more or less likely to gain weight. This type of research (focused on the analysis of specific foods and beverages) allows us to understand whether “calories are calories” or the intake of higher quality foods and fewer lower quality foods can lead to weight loss and its retention.

Researchers from the Department of Nutrition at Harvard University shows us that quality is actually very important in determining what we need to eat to achieve and maintain a healthy weight and that the concept of “calorie is calorie” is quite simple and does not reveal the whole picture.

In a study of more than 120,000 healthy women and men over a 20-year period, researchers found that weight change was most strongly associated with the intake of potato chips, French fries, sugar-sweetened beverages, and processed and unprocessed red meats. Researchers conclude that eating processed foods with more starch, refined grains, fats, and sugars can increase obesity.

Foods that have been shown to be associated with weight loss are vegetables, whole grains, fruits, nuts, and yogurt.

Researchers do not ignore the importance of calories but instead suggest that choosing high-quality foods (and reducing the consumption of low-quality foods) is an important factor in helping people consume fewer calories, as can you can read more on the topic here.

There is no “perfect” diet for everyone due to individual differences in genes and lifestyle.

You can learn more about the glycemic index and food load from our food navigator, suitable for people with diabetes or those who follow a diet based on carbohydrate composition.

What else do you need to watch out for?

Many people start eating healthy and change their diet and food choices on the menu, but still do not achieve results in terms of weight loss or retention. The most common mistake in these cases is a disturbing caloric balance. In other words, they consume more calories than they expend (albeit from healthy sources).

For example, nuts, avocados, and olive oil are high in calories and should be consumed in moderation.

If you have not chosen or are unsure what diet is right for you in terms of nutritional composition and calorie intake, consult a nutritionist or discuss the problem with your endocrinologist.

For the author:

D-r Angelina Nedyalkova graduated in medicine from Medical University of Plovdiv in 2013. In 2014 she started working and specializing in the Clinic of Endocrinology at the University Hospital "St. George" EAD, Plovdiv. In January 2019 she acquired a specialty in endocrinology and metabolic diseases.

Do you want more useful content?

Join our club and get early access to many free resources free resources.

check

100% security

check

NO SPAM

check

Keep your anonymity

check

You get a PDF guide

About our company

Help

Legal

Services

Podcasts